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THE GERMAN NEIGHBOUR

HD- DCP - 2017 - Argentina - 94 - Color

THE GERMAN NEIGHBOUR

EL VECINO ALEMAN (original title)


A film by Rosario Cervio and Martin Liji

 

Long live Germany! Long live Austria! Long live Argentina! These are the countries with which I have been most connected and which I will not forget. I had to obey the rules of war and my flag. I am ready.”

Last words of Adolf Eichmann,

Thursday evening on May 31st, 1962 at the gallows of Ramla prison

 

In 1960 Adolf Eichmann was kidnapped in Buenos Aires and taken illegally to Jerusalem for a trial.

A pure documentary integrating archive materials, the film shows through the eyes and research work of Renate, a young journalist, the awkward life of Adolf Eichmann in Argentina contrasting with the crimes he is defending against in Israel.




TOO BLACK TO BE FRENCH ?

DCP- HD - 2015 - French - 53 Min - Color / Black & White

TOO BLACK TO BE FRENCH ?

Trop noire pour être française? (original title)


A film by Isabelle Boni-Claverie

Filmmaker Isabelle Boni-Claverie, a black woman who grew up in a privileged environment, has none of the supposed social handicaps that could impede social integration. And yet, she is often an object of discrimination. Has the Republic lied to her?

A brazen question illuminated by the analysis of Eric Fassin, Pap Ndiaye and Achille Mbembe regarding the inequalities of our society.




I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO

DCP - HD - 2016 - USA, France, Belgium, Switzerland - 93 Min - Color / Black & White

I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO

Je ne suis pas votre nègre (original title)


A film by Raoul Peck

With the voice of Samuel L. Jackson

 Told entirely in the words of James Baldwin, through both personal appearances and the text of his final unfinished book project, Director Raoul Peck's I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO touches on the tragic deaths of Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr., and Medgar Evers to bring powerful clarity to how the image (and reality) of Blacks in America today is fabricated and enforced.




All Things Are Photographable

DCP - HD - 2017 - United States - 75 & 52 Min - Color / Black & White

All Things Are Photographable

All Things Are Photographable (original title)


A film by Sasha Waters Freyer

All Things Are Photographable is the first documentary film on the life and work of acclaimed photographer Garry Winogrand (1928-1984) – the epic storyteller of America across three turbulent decades.

His artistry encompassed the heartbreak, violence, hope and turmoil of postwar America, from the frenzy of its urban core to the alienation of its emergent suburbs. Thirty years on, his most well-known photos – of Marilyn Monroe, her skirt blown askew on the set of The Seven Year Itch; Norman Mailer’s 50th birthday party; tourists at Dealy Plaza in Dallas following the Kennedy assassination and among hundreds of others – remain unforgettable. He also captured city streets teeming with women newly liberated from the repressive 1950’s; rowdy Texas rodeos, political conventions and angry protests, zoos, parades and celebrity balls. His camera seized upon the spectacle of a massive social upheaval – that age when our now-global mania for self-promotion and exhibitionism was beginning.

  

 




Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun: A Touch of Grace

HD - 2015 - French - 90 min & 2 x 52 min - Color

Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun: A Touch of Grace

Le fabuleaux Elisabeth Vigée le Brun peintre de Marie- Antoinette (original title)


A film by Arnaud Xainte

« Between two centuries as at the confluence of two rivers». These words of Chateaubriand seem to be written for Louise-Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun. Born in 1755 and died in 1842, Louise-Elisabeth lived numerous and various periods of time, thanks to her exceptional longevity.

Official painter of Marie Antoinette, whose portrait she painted 30 times, she knew eight political systems, two revolutions, painted more than 660 portrayals, and received in her salon the whole political and artistic intelligentsia of the late 18th century until 1840. She fled the revolution in October 1789, for a 13 year long exile, going through Italia, Russia, Austria, England, and Switzerland. Everywhere, she was received by all the greatest courts of Europe and, besides posterity, was paid the highest fees of her time. The freedom of Louise Elisabeth, nonetheless an 18th century woman, echoes strongly with today’s women struggle, being the first French female painter to be recognized around the world.

The embodiment of the character by fiction appeared to us as the right choice obviously. Interviews of speakers are mixed with fictional scenes. These moments are an evocation of times and places when and where Louise Elisabeth lived, enlightening personal and historical events. In order to make the spectators feel the modernity of this character, the director used also some special effects: we zoom into the canvas so that we understand in a better way the meaning and the structure; engravings are animated; matte paintings remind us the poetry of the artist’s travels; several sequences mix fiction and painting.

EVL used fresh & bright colors and always painted her models in a graceful way, contrasting with the heavy settings usually employed at the time and the film pays homage to her unusual technique at the time.




The Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975

DCP - HD - 2011 - Sweden, USA - 92 & 52 - Color / Black & White

The Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975

The Black Power Mixtape (original title)


A film by Göran Hugo Olsson

The Black Power Mixtape is an archive- and music- driven documentary that examines the evolution of the Black Power Movement in the African-American community and Diaspora from 1967 to 1975. Combining startlingly fresh and meaningful 16mm footage that had been lying undiscovered in the cellar of Swedish Television for the past 30 years, with contemporary audio interviews from leading African-American artists, activists, musicians and scholars, Mixtape looks at the people, society, culture and style that fuelled a change. Utilizing an innovative format that riffs on the popular 70s mixtape format, the Black Power Mixtape is a cinematic and musical journey into the ghettos of America. At the end of the Sixties, Swedish interest in the US Civil Rights Movement and the US anti-war movement peaked. With a combination of commitment and naiveté, Swedish filmmakers traveled across the Atlantic to explore the Black Power Movement. Filmmaker Göran Hugo Olsson brings this newly discovered footage to light and introduces it to a new generation across the world in a penetrating examination – through the lens of Swedish filmmakers – of the Black Power Movement from 1967-1975, and its worldwide resonance.




In Search of Josephine

HD - 2012 - French - 2x52' - Color

In Search of Josephine

A la recherche de Josephine (original title)


A film by Eric Elléna

This two-part documentary series revisits the life of an incredibly modern woman from her childhood spent in the island of Martinique, to her coronation as an Empress at age 41, and finally to her death – from a simple cold – ten years later in her palace, Malmaison. We find ourselves retracing her steps in France and Italy and discover a character much more complex and interesting than what has been written about her by previous historians.

With the help of historical reenactments, paintings and illustrations, this revealing documentary series reconstructs the important moments of her extraordinary life. Having survived a devastating hurricane, a death sentence, firing cannons, a bombing and even a balcony fall, Josephine continues to fascinate millions of people worldwide, not only because she was wife to one of the most well-known characters in history, but also because the life she led – full of drama and grandeur – was greater than any role ever imagined in fiction.




Through Japanese Cinema

Beta Dig - 2012 - France - 2 x 55 min - Color

Through Japanese Cinema

Through Japanese Cinema (original title)


A film by Hubert Niogret

The exclusive domination of large corporations-production-distribution operation for over thirty years, and its collapse at the time of questioning global powers and the emergence of new styles and the conquest of new territories (animation) seemed to justify the cutting of a documentary on the recent history of Japanese cinema into two parts, corresponding to nearly equal lengths (20 to 30 years), and generations of filmmakers:
1. The cinema of protest and renewal, the emergence of independent after the Golden Age: careers with Nagisa Oshima, Yoshishige Yoshida, Shohei Imamura, Masaki Kobayashi ... the early 60s until the 90s.
2. The renewal of the images and the New Territories today: with the careers of Hayao Miyazaki, Satoshi Kon, Otomo, director Takashi Miike, Takeshi Kitano, Hideo Nakata, Kiyoshi Kurosawa ... the late 90's to today.




King Hu

Beta Dig - 2012 - France - 48 min - Color

King Hu

King Hu (original title)


A film by Hubert Niogret

Bodies which float in the air and cross swords, a young woman jumping from a roof of a pagoda to another, a young woman jumping through a window and turning on wounded two attackers, a monk who with a wave of his big rod reverses its opponents, swordsmen who use the flexibility of large bamboo to bounce from one end to another of a forest. In an open or enclosed area of a tavern, the fighters of the films of King Hu, amaze, fascinate by their exploits, which are all forms of actions of dreamlike flights.




The Misfits of Cinema

HD - 2012 - France - 52 min - Color / Black & White

The Misfits of Cinema

Les Enfants Terribles du Cinema (original title)


A film by Ezéquiel Fernandez

How did a generation of post-war cinephiles manage to change the course of cinematic history?

In1948, ahandful of cinema enthusiast founded “Objectif49”, a “Cine-Club” in Paris whose existence would be as dazzling as it would be brief. A few months later, they came up with the idea of a showcase demonstration for art house films, thus giving birth, in the summer of 1949, to the “Festival du Film Maudit”. Jean Cocteau played the leading role in this effort with support from Jacques Rivette, Eric Rohmer, Jean Charles Tacchella, Alexandre Astruc, Jacques Doniol-Valcroze and Pierre Kast…

Ten years before the official birth of the New Wave movement, these young filmmakers, inspired by a fresh, new artistic vision, laid the foundation for today’s cinema.

 

Pictures: Georges Dambier, Miguel Sanchez Martin (last picture hereunder)